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Significant Digits For Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016

You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the numbers tucked inside the news.


€0

Cost to take the Paris Metro right now. Due to smog conditions, the city has made public transportation free and has banned half the vehicles from the road at a given day. Related: I’m asking for a friend who is sick and tired of the MTA and could use some extra cash around the holidays, but does anyone know how to generate a substantial amount of smog? [The Independent]


5

So far five babies have been born with “Zika-related brain developmental symptoms” in New York City. [The New York Times]


11 times

People who groomed their pubic hair were found to be more likely to have an STD, with those who remove all of it more than 11 times per year more than four times as likely to have an STD. This was published in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections, which as far as branding goes is up there with the “Great Dismal Swamp” when it comes to bad names for things you want people to enjoy. [NPR]


28 percent

For a typical family, that’s the percentage of income that goes towards rent as of 2014. In 1980, that figure was 25 percent. [Gallup]


59 percent

Percentage of Americans who want abortion to be all or mostly legal, according to a 2016 Pew Research Center poll, largely unchanged since a 1995 ABC News/Washington Post poll that found the same number in favor. Ohio is considering a bill that would make abortion illegal around only six weeks after conception. [FiveThirtyEight]


9,684

Number of consecutive snaps played by Joe Thomas, a left tackle — among the best in the NFL — has played for the Cleveland Browns. He has outlived 6 head coaches and 18 starting QBs. He may be on an organization that goes 0-16 this year. He still shows up. As far as I am concerned Joe Thomas is an inspiration to us all. [ESPN]


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Walt Hickey was FiveThirtyEight’s chief culture writer.

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