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Significant Digits For Monday, Oct. 9, 2017

You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the numbers tucked inside the news.


7 percent

A power substation failed in San Juan on Sunday, dropping the percentage of residents of the Puerto Rican capital with power down to 7 percent from 12 percent before the failure. The repair of the substation was expected Sunday evening. [NBC News]


13 percent

Beer sales for Constellation Brands — the domestic distributor of Corona and Modelo — were up 13 percent over the summer despite sales of domestic beer being down. American love of Mexican beer has led to a solid 36 percent boost for the company’s stock this year. [The Wall Street Journal]


20 percent

The board of the Weinstein Company has fired Harvey Weinstein after a sexual harassment scandal stemming from a New York Times investigation showed evidence of sexual misconduct towards employees and entertainment industry colleagues stretching back decades. Weinstein controls around 20 percent of the production company and reportedly resisted being removed. [Variety]


26 percent

Marital status is increasingly related to wealth: In 1990, according to the AEI research, 51 percent of poor, 57 percent of working class and 65 percent of middle and upper class adults aged 18 to 55 are married. Today, only 26 percent of poor Americans aged 18 to 55 are married, while 39 percent of working class and 56 percent of the latter groups are hitched. [The Guardian]


$242,500

Estimated gross cost to taxpayers for Vice President Mike Pence to fly a C-32 from Las Vegas to Indianapolis and then to Los Angeles Sunday. The purpose of the trip was so that he could briefly attend and then promptly leave an Indianapolis Colts game citing the ongoing NFL players’ protest of police mistreatment of African-Americans. The RNC will reimburse the government for a portion of the cost of the L.A. leg because the Vice President attended a political event there. [CNN]


$31.5 million

Domestic box office gross for “Blade Runner 2049,” a disappointment for a film based on an established property and with an estimated break-even point at somewhere from $155 million to $170 million. [Deadline]


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Walt Hickey is FiveThirtyEight’s chief culture writer.

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