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Significant Digits For Monday, June 19, 2017

You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the numbers tucked inside the news.


6

Six members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS resigned Friday, saying they could not be effective under a “president who simply does not care.” [The Verge]


40 percent

Norway is a paradox: It’s looking to cut its carbon emissions by 40 percent, which is nice, but oil and gas represent 12 percent of its economy and more than a third of its exports. It is the poster child for never getting high on your own supply. [The New York Times]


77 percent

Uber’s share of the U.S. ride hailing market at the end of May, down from 84 percent at the start of 2017, according to a study of credit card data. Rival Lyft has made steady gains as Uber suffered a serious of scandals that damaged its reputation. [The Financial Times]


361 percent

Germany granted citizenship to 2,865 U.K. nationals last year, up 361 percent from the previous year. British people have to live in Germany for at least 10 years to get eligibility for citizenship; experts suspect Brexit is behind the explosion in applications. [Bloomberg]


$1.3 billion

President Donald Trump has earned at least $1.3 billion in revenue since he announced his bid for the presidency in June 2015. Turns out politics can be pretty lucrative. Income from Trump’s Mar-A-Lago club increased 139 percent in January 2016 to April 2017 compared to January 2014 to April 2015. [The Center for Responsive Politics]


$22 billion

Amazon announced Friday that it’s buying Whole Foods for $13.7 billion, and the market reaction was swift and unmerciful for other grocery chains, which could be threatened by the internet juggernaut’s move into their turf. All told, $22 billion in market value was wiped out from grocery-related stocks on Friday with Kroger, Target and Walmart all taking a hit. [CNN Money]


If you see a significant digit in the wild, send it to @WaltHickey.

Walt Hickey is FiveThirtyEight’s chief culture writer.

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