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Significant Digits For Friday, Sept. 16, 2016

You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the telling numbers tucked inside the news.


28.4 percent

Playboy, which no longer contains nudity, saw sales at newsstands jump 28.4 percent in the first six months since the change. At the same time, subscriptions dropped 23.2 percent, presumably among the crowd unaware of internet porn and also uninterested in fine journalism for men of established taste. [New York Post]


58 percent

A Center for Public Integrity/Ipsos poll found that 58 percent of respondents considered Donald Trump dishonest when discussing financial and business dealings, with 50 percent saying the same thing about Hillary Clinton. [The Center for Public Integrity]


$835,000

Mattel, Viacom and Jumpstar will pay a total of $835,000 after it was found that they had been pushing out cookies on their websites and tracking kids, which is not legal. Viacom was hit with $500,000 for trackers on its Nick Jr. and Nickelodeon websites, Mattel was fined $250,000 for tracking tech on websites for kids toys, and Jumpstar owed $85,000 for sending visitor data to Facebook. Hasbro wasn’t fined but had tracking tech on its Nerf site. [BBC]


8.5 million

The population of New York City has passed 8.5 million, according to the latest estimates, the highest it has ever been. [The New York Times]


7.2 billion

Total airline passengers in 2015 in major regions, according to a trade association. Traffic was up 6.4 percent, buoyed by growth in the Middle East and Asia-Pacific regions. [Bloomberg]


$1.2 trillion

A conservative estimate of the annual value of religious institutions, properties, establishments such as hospitals and schools, and faith-based businesses in the United States, according to a new study. These institutions employ hundreds of thousands of people. [The Guardian]


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Walt Hickey was FiveThirtyEight’s chief culture writer.

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