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FiveThirtyEight

Politics

There are more ways to count the popular vote (by my count, 972) than there are to eat a Whopper. And now you can pick your favorite.

Note: I had originally used 200,000 as my estimate for Washington caucus turnout, which is a fairly widely reported figure. However, the Washington State Democrats estimate that “more than 250,000″ persons participated in their caucus, so I am now using 250,000 instead.

The spreadsheet lets you make seven different choices about how to count the popular vote:

1. Count Florida fully, at 50 percent, or not at all.
2. Count Michigan fully, at 50 percent, or not at all.
3. Don’t count the Michigan uncommitteds, or count them for Obama, or allocate the Michigan uncommitteds based on the exit poll results, or allocate ALL Michigan votes based on the exit poll results (this distinction is important because roughly 20 percent of Clinton voters said they actually preferred another candidate).
4. Count Puerto Rico and other territories, or just the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
5. Count the Texas caucuses, or don’t count them, or count both the Texas caucus and the Texas primary at 50 percent.
6. Count the advisory primaries in Nebraska, Washington and Idaho or not.
7. Count the estimated caucus votes in Washington, Maine, Iowa and Nevada, or only count caucuses with “hard” voting totals, or don’t count caucuses at all.

EDIT: If you want to use the original, hard-copy XLS version, that link can be found here.

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